Special Projects

The Special Projects Fund is a source of funding for graduate student-initiated projects and other events of significant interest or value to graduate students across campus. The GSA budget allocates $8000 each year for all such projects; the amount offered to any one project is limited to $1000.

Application Submission

To apply, submit the application (below) along with a one-page proposal to the GSA office. The proposal must outline the project, the project budget, what sources of funding you currently have, who the project is meant to target, and what benefits it provides to graduate students. Please include contact information for the project organizers. Please note: applications and proposals are due at least six weeks prior to the event in order to allow adequate time for consideration by the GSA. Additionally, the GSA can only reimburse expenses. To obtain a reimbursement, you must submit: an attendance list, a flyer, an agenda, and receipts to gsaoffice@ucdavis.edu within 21 days of your event.

Please fill out the Special Projects Funding Application Form: .docx or .pdf

Approval Process

The GSA Executive Council will meet to consider your proposal and, if necessary, gather additional information from you. The Executive Council will then present your project at the next GSA Assembly meeting, along with their recommendation as to whether the GSA should fund the project and in what amount. You will be informed of the meeting date and time. We strongly recommend that you attend and be prepared to give a brief statement about your project and answer any questions from the Assembly. The GSA Assembly will make the final decision as to whether to fund your project. If your project is approved, a follow-up survey to gather reimbursement information will be emailed to the listed contact.

Reimbursement of Expenses

The GSA office will reimburse you for expenses associated with your project up to the amount of your award. To be reimbursed, you must submit original receipts to the GSA office coordinator in 253 South Silo. If your expenses will include compensating individuals for their efforts on your project, you must arrange, in advance, for direct payment from our office to those individuals. Some expenses, such as those associated with travel, require completion of forms available in the GSA office.

Currently Funded Special Projects

Past Funded Special Projects

(2015-2016)

 (2014-2015)

  • 5th Annual Davis Math Conference
  • GLOBE – GLOBAL Speakers
  • Ecology Interdisciplinary Symposium
  • Graduate Students of Color Mentorship Program
  • LASER – Interdisciplinary Arts and Science Speaker Series
  • 2015 Plant Breeding Symposium
  • 2015 Food Championship
  • Psychology Conference
  • Second Annual UC Davis Symposium on Language Research

Letter from Symposium on Language Research

The Cluster on Language Research received funding to support its second annual UC Davis Symposium on Language Research. The event was held on the UC Davis campus on Friday, May 22, 2015 and attracted 126 participants, including 36 papers from 9 different California universities (UC Davis, UC Berkeley, UC Santa Cruz, UC Irvine, University of the Pacific, Middlebury Institute of International Studies, SF State, CSU East Bay, CSU Long Beach). Approximately 25% of the attendees came from over 15 institutions other than UC Davis, which reflects the conscious decision to broaden the appeal of what was primarily a local conference last year.

More importantly, the success of this year’s Symposium makes clear how the Cluster on Language Research has forged a bridge among language researchers coming from radically distinct research traditions, goals, and methodologies. The presenters included graduate students and faculty from 7 different academic departments: Linguistics, Spanish, French, Education, TESOL/English, and Modern Languages and Literatures.  The three finalists for the most innovative conference presentation came from a linguistics (UC Davis), psychology (UC Berkeley), and education (UC Berkeley) background, respectively.

Nick Ellis, this year’s keynote speaker, was symbolic of this new synergism, coming himself from cognitive psychology with an interest first in dyslexia, aphasia, and first-language acquisition followed by his seminal work in second language acquisition.  His keynote lecture on the future of usage-based approaches to language and language acquisition held the audience spellbound.

With this in mind, the symposium was packed full of exciting learning opportunities for scholars not only at UC Davis but also in the language research community in California. Our strong support from sponsors on campus, including the GSA, has ensured that this second annual symposium surpassed the great success achieved at the inaugural symposium last year, thus raising the bar for future conferences related to language research. 

(Excerpted from letter by Kimberly Morris & Emily Moline, Co-chairs of the Cluster on Language Research, 2014-15)